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The 3rd International Conference on  
Autonomous Robots and Agents    
12-14 December 2006  -  Palmerston North, New Zealand

Special Sessions

ICARA solicits special session proposals. The special sessions are intended to stimulate in-depth discussions in special areas relevant to the conference theme. The session organisers will coordinate the review process for their session papers. The conference proceedings will include all papers from the special sessions. Please submit your proposal to ICARA2006@massey.ac.nz by 31st March 2006.

A special session will normally have 6 papers. Special session organisers will be able to register for the conference at 50% discount provided the session has at least 6 papers (including one from the special session organiser).

The special session papers will follow the same timeline as other papers.

 

Special Session on Artificial Life and Living Robots

Organised by Peter J Bentley, University College, London
 

Special Session on Computational Intelligence for Communication Robots

Organised by Yoshikazu Mori, Ibaraki University, and Naoyuki Kubota, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan


 
Special Session on Affective Computing and Adaptive Human-Machine Interaction

Organised by Abdolhossein Sarrafzadeh, Massey University, New Zealand

Special Session on Robot Soccer

Organised by Peter Kopacek and Man Wook Han, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria
 
 


  Manuscript Submission     

  Acceptance Notification     

  Camera Ready Submission     

  Advance Registration     
 

15 July 2006   30 July 2006

31 August 2006  

13 October 2006  

13 October 2006  

 

Peter BentleySpecial Session on Artificial Life and Living Robots

Organised by Peter J Bentley, University College, London

The study of living systems has never been more relevant to robotics. Artificial life now informs us of how organisms can reproduce, build and repair themselves. Bio-inspired algorithms give our technology the ability to adapt, evolve and learn. Bio-mimetics teaches us how novel materials may be exploited to achieve new capabilities. This special session focuses on such exciting new areas, and aims to produce an in-depth discussion about how biology should be used to improve our technology. Papers should be submitted to Peter Bentley following the ICARA conference guidelines.

Deadline for submission is 15 July 2006   30 July 2006.

Submissions on the following topics are welcomed:
  • Artificial life and the simulation of adaptive behaviour
  • Computer models or physical robots that exhibit biological properties such as adaptation, learning, self-design, self-building, self-repair.
  • Synthetic biology, including nanorobotics and artificial cells.
  • Computer models or physical robots that exploit evolutionary algorithms, neural networks, swarm intelligence, artificial immune systems, ant colony optimisation or other bio-inspired algorithms.
  • Physical robots inspired by living systems that exploit novel materials such as 3D printers, shape memory alloys, ferrofluids, solar cells or other materials.

Special Session on Affective Computing and Adaptive Human-Machine Interaction

Organised by Abdolhossein Sarrafzadeh, Massey University, New Zealand

Robots without the ability to detect human emotions and computers with the current state of technology being limited to the keyboard and mouse are no more than autistic machines. This has made affect-based human robot interaction an area of increasing importance in recent years. Human emotions and nonverbal communications are a vital part of human-human communication.

Many computer systems and robots would significantly improve performance if they could adapt to the emotional state of the humans using them, for example if robots, information/ help kiosks, ATMs, or automatic ticketing machines could recognise when users were confused, frustrated or angry they could adapt themselves or guide the user back to remedial help systems so improving the service. However, not being able to estimate the affective state of the users they are not able to offer these additional capabilities.

Affective computing is a promising area in providing solutions to the many problems in detection, interpretation, inclusion and expression of emotions in future human-robot and human-computer interfaces. Realising the growth in the field of affective computing in recent years, this Special Session aims to provide a forum for scientists and emerging researchers to discuss problems, present their solutions and exchange ideas. The Special Session aims to provide an environment for the research community of affective computing and human machine interaction to strengthen possibilities for collaborations providing for improved solutions for the existing problems of affective computing and human robot interaction.

Prospective authors are invited to submit papers for presentation at the Special Session. Papers should be submitted to Abdolhossein Sarrafzadeh  following the ICARA conference guidelines.

Deadline for submission is 15 July 2006   30 July 2006.

Scope of the Special Session

  • Affective robotics and humanoid robots
  • Detection of emotion and non-verbal cues
  • Emotion and nonverbal communications in game playing
  • Affect in virtual reality
  • Expression of affect by computers and robots
  • Affective tutoring systems
  • Adapting through emotions and nonverbal cues in intelligent user interfaces
  • Theoretical aspects of emotions

Special Session on Computational Intelligence for Communication Robots

Organized by Yoshikazu Mori, Ibaraki University, and Naoyuki Kubota, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan

Recently, communication robots such as pet robot, amusement robot, and partner robots have been developed for the natural interaction and communication with humans. Advanced computational intelligence including neural and fuzzy computing, evolutionary computation, and reinforcement learning is the most promising and emerging technology for the adaptation, evolution, and learning of communication robots. The aim of this special session is to discuss the emergence of intelligence of communication robots interacting with humans and dynamic environments. Papers should be submitted to Yoshikazu Mori
following the ICARA conference guidelines.

Deadline for paper submission is 15 July 2006   30 July 2006.

The topics include

  • Computational Theory of Adaptation and Evolution for Communication Robots
  • Computational Intelligence for Communication Robots
  • Human-friendly Robots and Social Communication
  • Multiple Communication Robots and Collaborative Learning
  • Speech Recognition and Gesture Recognition
  • Imitative Learning and Social Learning
  • Adaptation to Dynamic Environments

Special Session on Robot Soccer

Organised by Peter Kopacek and Man Wook Han, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria

A soccer robot is an excellent example for inter-disciplinarity. For construction and manufacturing of the body knowledge of mechanical and because of the small dimensions precision engineering is required. Electrical as well as control engineering is necessary for the drives and the power source. The control and communication board of the robot is more or less applied electronics. As an internal controller, the microprocessor is also responsible for the wireless communication with the host computer. For these tasks and for the software of the host computer, fundamental knowledge in computer science is necessary. The software of the host computer include real-time image processing, game strategies, control of the own players, communication with these and user interface. Robot soccer was introduced with the purpose to develop intelligent cooperative multi-robot (agents) systems (MAS). A soccer robot is an intelligent, autonomous agent, carrying out tasks together with other agents in a cooperative, coordinated and communicative way. Robot soccer provides a good opportunity to implement and test MAS algorithms. Robot soccer is a reasonably cheap test-bed for future industrial applications of MAS and a possibility to attract young researchers to deal with automation. Papers should be submitted to Peter Kopacek following the ICARA conference guidelines.

Deadline for submission is 30 July 2006.

Scope of the special session:

  • Mobile robots
  • Advanced control
  • Modelling
  • Multi-Agent-Systems
  • Robot Swarms
  • Image processing
  • Edutainment